TPK Walk 53: Crafthole – St John’s Down

I think this is my last walk for a while because I have got a heel problem 😦 I am over half way though 🙂

I will use my recuperation time to compose and work towards an exhibition…

It was such an interesting walk on a sunny day.

Highlights were Lugger’s man made cave (below) marked ‘Grotto’ on the OS map (below below) which reminded me of Prussia Cove, and the impressive Tregantle fort and ‘danger area’ firing range.lugger grottodanger areaFrom one range to another I walked.golf hole2Looe bayLooking back towards Looe I caught the golf strike moment  🙂   Below, Whitsand bay stretches out to Rame Head in the distance before Plymouth Sound.Whitsand bay2Whitsand bayDCIM102GOPROSunnychucklesThe water was still, clear and inviting.  gorceous hillgrassMelanargia galatheaThe fields were full of colour and life like this Marbled white butterfly (Melanargia galathea) above and I try and follow the random flutter by movements with my pencil (below)  DCIM102GOPROTregantle fort6All this beauty Juxtaposed against Tregantle fort and its brutal raison d etre. Little observation huts are dotted around.  Tregantle fort5I relished walking into the ‘danger area’ but the red flags were down on the numerous poles.  Warning poleTregantle fort4Tregantle fort3RNLI 1Built to deter French attack in the mid 19th century, the imposing battery is still used for Royal Navy training but some of the buildings are now also used for accommodation and the army use the surrounding area as a firing range.  Tregantle fort2Tregantle fortORD 52DCIM102GOPROWillowherb (purple) and meadowsweet  (cream white) combine stunningly against the blue sea.  Meadowsweet willowherbThe very popular coves and Whitsand bay are looked on by the RNLI.  DCIM102GOPROAnd just below the RNLI hut was where the Navy man by the name of ‘Lugger’ dug his cave with a view and apparently recovered from an illness of gout. lugger grotto2The nearby village of Freathy has holiday homes galore just on the edge of spectacular creekside hills and valleys. Perfect for scouting deer that I stumbled upon leaping and playing now in the distance, also enjoying the weather.  DCIM102GOPROdeerStrava 52

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TPK Walk 53: Crafthole – St John’s Down

I think this is my last walk for a while because I have got a heel problem 😦 I am over half way though 🙂

I will use my recuperation time to compose and work towards an exhibition…

It was such an interesting walk on a sunny day.

Highlights were Lugger’s man made cave (below) marked ‘Grotto’ on the OS map (below below) which reminded me of Prussia Cove, and the impressive Tregantle fort and ‘danger area’ firing range.lugger grottodanger areaFrom one range to another I walked.golf hole2Looe bayLooking back towards Looe I caught the golf strike moment  🙂   Below, Whitsand bay stretches out to Rame Head in the distance before Plymouth Sound.Whitsand bay2Whitsand bayDCIM102GOPROSunnychucklesThe water was still, clear and inviting.  gorceous hillgrassMelanargia galatheaThe fields were full of colour and life like this Marbled white butterfly (Melanargia galathea) above and I try and follow the random flutter by movements with my pencil (below)  DCIM102GOPROTregantle fort6All this beauty Juxtaposed against Tregantle fort and its brutal raison d etre. Little observation huts are dotted around.  Tregantle fort5I relished walking into the ‘danger area’ but the red flags were down on the numerous poles.  Warning poleTregantle fort4Tregantle fort3RNLI 1Built to deter French attack in the mid 19th century, the imposing battery is still used for Royal Navy training but some of the buildings are now also used for accommodation and the army use the surrounding area as a firing range.  Tregantle fort2Tregantle fortORD 52DCIM102GOPROWillowherb (purple) and meadowsweet  (cream white) combine stunningly against the blue sea.  Meadowsweet willowherbThe very popular coves and Whitsand bay are looked on by the RNLI.  DCIM102GOPROAnd just below the RNLI hut was where the Navy man by the name of ‘Lugger’ dug his cave with a view and apparently recovered from an illness of gout. lugger grotto2The nearby village of Freathy has holiday homes galore just on the edge of spectacular creekside hills and valleys. Perfect for scouting deer that I stumbled upon leaping and playing now in the distance, also enjoying the weather.  DCIM102GOPROdeerStrava 52

TPK Walk 52: No Mans Land to Crafthole

Click on the link below.

This walk was done in two takes and my friend Mary came with me on the second one.

ORD 51bSunrise over Saltash and the Tamar estuary.saltash sunrise

Enjoying the fine grasses 🙂DCIM100GOPRO

Getting too warm for sheepcoats now.  Sheep wool fenceSheep lifelineThis sheep poo was the first mark on the artboard.

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Below: Woody nightshade Solanum dulcamara. PS this is not the really poisonous rarer Deadly nightshade  (next picture)Solanum dulcamara

Image result for deadly nightshade

Off the beaten track we meet Mark, a ‘post-internet-ist’ (below), who grew up playing in the now derelict and ruined St Germans hut, a former hunting lodge of the Earl of St Germans. Mark and his partner Sam were back to explore childhood memories of place and shared stories and poetry of an anti-capitalist flavour with us:

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“The concrete world of concentration, is the inevitable phase which is last, dispersal of the masses is a relic of the past.

Migration to the markets, consumption, pollution and greed, the natural world survives, clinging to its seed.

And as if it is the catalyst to the future, money changes hands, making the future just wants [not needs], followed by a fungus of hands.

Yet the human race runs on, seemingly never to tire, thinking its new technology will be the true messiah.

But bridges and roads, and now the internet, are just tentacles, desperately searching for more, because space is not mans domain, we’ve already lost our war.

As well as contributing to the artboard…DCIM100GOPRO

St Germans Hut Circa 1890:  St Germans lodge 1890

St Germans Hut 2018:  St Germans3St Germans1St Germans4Strange woodland forms now occupy the area.wood creaturesAs well as the underrated stinking Iris- Iris foetidissima – good for deep shade spots.DCIM100GOPROA secret path leads down to the secluded naturist beach and shag rock… Hmm…shag rock

Sea Kale and Rock Samphire grow in abundance out of the cliff.

DCIM100GOPROFresh green sprigs of Rock Samphire Crithmum maritimum makes a tasty marine garnish to avocado crackers with a touch of sea salt! Rock samphire avo crackers

Back on the coastal path the sheep breed are adapted to the steep cliffside grazing and I find mechanically shawn and naturally shed wool for the artworks. SheepAnd we head off with Whitsand Bay in the distance. (note the Sea Kale*)DCIM101GOPRO3 weeks ago Sea thrift dominated the ground coverage (below)Sea thrift glory

Now delicious grasses compete for light, colour and texture. Beautiful grasses sea TPAnd the coastal path is dotted with wanderers.fellow walkerWhitsand view2In funnily named Portwrinkle we meet a genuine Wild Forager who teaches us how to cook Sea Kale!*

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There are trendy ‘eco’ homes with fabulous views.Portwrinkle refelctionPortwrinkle refelction 2But the doves and pigeons have the best house of all up on the golf course outside Crafthole, complete with state of the art oculus skylight (below)Portwrinkle dovecote viewPortwrinkle dovecoteAnd the delightful little village of Crafthole has local volunteers selling everything you need for community life. DCIM101GOPRODrawing 2 (completed yesterday)ORD 51bDrawing 1 (completed 3 weeks back)ORD 51c

Thanks to Mary for carrying my violin 😉 Shes an artist studying an MA at Plymouth, check out her work at marytrapp.co.uk she recently exhibited at the Poly in Falmouth.

The route taken. Thanks for reading.strava 51

TPK Walk 51: St Martins, Isles of Scilly

Yep there’s 99 trigpoints in Cornwall and ONE on the Isles of Scilly… So after the gig championships on a sunny day I walked the perimeter of St Martins and what felt and looked like paradise, drawing, photographing and collecting objects.St Martins bay colours wow2I tried to capture some of the colours through the found objectsFOTs St MartinsSt Martins bay colours wow7And through my violin.DCIM151GOPRODevils Coach Beetle – Ocypus olens – Chris Bass?Ocypus olensDCIM156GOPROI had to pinch myself. Its so intensely beautiful. Beyond description.DCIM147GOPRODCIM148GOPRODCIM149GOPROBodmin carribeanSt Martins bay colours wow5St Martins bay colours wow4St Martins bay colours wowDCIM156GOPROSt Martins bay colours wow3The trigpoint has a crayon ‘Where’s Wally’ monument behind it (AKA the St Martins Daymark, built in 1683 and the earliest surviving navigational beacon in UK) DCIM157GOPRODCIM157GOPROVerges near the 3 little hamlets have bulbous escapees from the famous bulb industry like this red Amarylis belladonna lily.DCIM157GOPROglasshouse tiesDCIM157GOPROThere is one road.DCIM157GOPROAnd only 8 or 9 original islanders left, according to Mr Ashford (below)DCIM157GOPRONo shortage of EchiumsDCIM157GOPROAnd pretty cottages bursting with botanical beauties.St martins cottageDCIM157GOPROThere are 2 ferry’s a day back to St Mary’s.DCIM157GOPROAnd I joined Lawrence once more, a St Ives potter and gig rower who helped rescue my map case which blew into the sea and shared his delicious salted foccacia bread with me 🙂 DCIM157GOPROSt Martins boatsDrubbing St MartinsDrubbing St Martins2Drubbing St Martins3Strava St Martins

TPK Walk 50: The Monkey Sanctuary – No Man’s Land

DCIM146GOPROThe Monkey Sanctuary, just outside Looe, is an excellent place to visit.  They have great staff like Etta (below) who kindly introduced me to the Monkey Sanctuary community and contributed to my artwork*,DCIM146GOPROThey have passionate and educated leaders like Sarah (below), who are prioritising the welfare of the monkeys and campaigning of monkey issues today whilst trying to balance the very real need to obtain sustainable funding streams from being a small specialist visitor attraction and a charity that receives no government funding.DCIM146GOPRO

Below are three pictures of the adorable Wooly Monkey (Lagothrix lagotricha) but the sanctuary also houses many other monkey species too that are in danger.Wooly monkey Lagothrix lagotricha 2Wooly monkey Lagothrix lagotricha 3Wooly monkeys 1The staff are very knowledgeable and friendly, giving an intimate insight into the life and work of the sanctuary. Please visit them if you are in the area!  https://www.monkeysanctuary.org/DCIM146GOPROBack walking again other creatures great and small were everywhere. This speckled wood butterfly below (Pararge aegeria) I saw just before an adder snake slid in front of me on the coastal path yikes (I wasn’t quick enough to capture the beauty of its patterning and movement and was of course slightly scared!)Pararge aegeria Speckled WoodNext thing I was nearly trampled by wild ponies who were startled by an aero glider blissfully unaware of the frightened creatures on the coastal path below (this moment my gopro just caught)DCIM146GOPROTwo other ponies back tracked and ran down a lower path.Wild poniesWildflowers were also everwhere: Pink Purslane below (Claytonia sibirica) in dappled shadeClaytonia sibirica Pink PurslaneGreater Stitchwort (Stellaria holostea) bursting from the banks and verges,Stellaria holostea Greater StitchwortAnd our common Bluebell (Hyacinthoides non-scripta), not to be confused with the Spanish Bluebell (Hyacinthoides hispanica) which is larger and more vigorous, identified by taller upright spikes of flowers and lighter blue colouring as well as larger leaves. The common bluebell has a darker blue colouring, is scented and the flower spikes gently bend over at the tips.Bluebell beautyAnd Honesty (Lunaria annua) is spotted this time of year by its rich purple colour and upright habit, localised on banks and steep verges, and it reminds me to try to be honest and truthful. You may know it by its beautiful oval seed disks with paper thin transluscent skin that are like little purses holding the seeds… HonestyDown a steep wooded valley and I am at Seaton where the river Seaton meets the south coast and speculative builders cash in on the Cornish riviera.DCIM146GOPRONo idea what it means (and neither does google) but An Palmek (below) wins font of the week and a rubbing of this formed a central line on my artwork*an palmekA plant which shows its greatness here – tumbling Rosemary (Rosmarinus prostratus) just loves cascading down a steep bank or wall, neatly covering any surface area beautifully whilst still providing Rosemary sprigs for cooking!Rosmarinus prostratusAnd this man was very chuffed with his Canary Island Date Palm (Pheonix canariensis) which regularly grows to house size proportions down on these sheltered coasts.DCIM147GOPROI soon had to climb back out of the coved valley, meeting more retired folk with time and projects on their hands…DCIM147GOPROFinishing at trigpoint number 50 (below) at a place which some maps call no mans land. The Skylarks were singing as I arrived and will no doubt accompany me next time I walk.DCIM147GOPRO*Thanks to Harriet and Etta for their beautiful contributions ringed in red below. You girls made my day! PS the top one is Etta’s floral sage pattern, the bottom two are ‘not- looking-at-the-page-while-you-draw’ portraits of me and Etta by Harriet! xORD 50cont

The route:50 strava

TPK Walk 49: Looe golf club – Penhale farm nr the Monkey sanctuary

Up here on the 7th tee where the trigpoint now sits, an Armada Beacon was reputedly lit with the Spanish Armada threats. DCIM145GOPROI’m pleased to draw these modern communication beacons as they form striking outline shapes on the landscape. DCIM145GOPROThis time of the year and after a cold winter, nature is bursting forth wherever you look. Braken and fern fronds are unfurling everywhere with exquisite gracefulness. Bracken unfurlingBracken unfurling2DCIM146GOPROAway from the towns Cornwall is essentially rural and very easy on the eye… countryside valleyThese cows were very joyful to see me, jostling for my attention, and sniffed and snorted in unison whilst I happily drew the beasts up close. DCIM146GOPROCornwall’s numerous valleys enclose magical streams overflowing with life. stream colour2streamAt St Wenna’s Church I met workers Dan (below left) and James (below right), Looe locals and RIVAL GIG ROWERS (!) from Looe Pilot Gig Club. We spoke and laughed about the good life in Cornwall. DCIM146GOPROJames spoke of stories and myths of goods being smuggled up the river from Looe out of sight of the authorities to Morval House (below). Morval house1Morval house lakeThe well worn and remembered valley floor leading from Morval House out to the East Looe river now has a beautiful duck pond and steeply forested hillsides where in the past the best apple trees for cider were harvested and seaweed was loaded onto boats to be taken to surrounding farms for fertiliser. woodlandToday the land continues to be managed for small scale forestry and pheasant shooting, the cackle of the birds retorting every so often, as loud as they are stupid, a simple curious creature bred to be easy to shoot. DCIM146GOPROBelow: Where Morval (in Cornish lit. ‘Sea-valley’) meets the East Looe river, the B3252 road and the Looe Valley railway line (a very picturesque journey up to Liskeard and Bodmin Parkway) Looe railway and riverORD 49a. Im pleased with the little rubbing of a sign with an endearing little game shooter graphic – top right above ‘ESTATE’ ORD 49aCarrying on a little way downstream the East Looe river meets the West Looe river which winds its way back to Trelawney’s house (see TPK Walk 42: Polperro – Pelynt ), the geography of the land forming the history and politics of social existence. W and E Looe river meetingOne for Jonah Horne and graphic design fontaphiles – the Old BT ‘manual plugging wires into holes to connect you to the world’ place, with a lovely exposed aggregate classic 70’s pebble dash. Beautiful. telephone exchangeLooe is where you really have to guard your pasty and pretty much anything you are holding for seagull attack. There’s plenty of unsuspecting tourists about… Looe harbourAnd fishermen and charterboat businesses daily clean their boat decks of guano.  Looe fishing boatsAround the cliff sides along the endlessly sublime coastal path black eyed Kittiwakes ( a much milder and civilised seabird than the blessed Herring gull) are smiling paired masters of cliff acrobatics who seem to be exhilarated with their daredevil aeronautics.kittiwakesAnd boxes are also perched. Glass and brushed aluminium ones. villa to let3White washed modernist ones.villa to let2And around into the next, somewhat gloomier looking valley of Millendreath, plastic grass and union jack flag villa boxes. Some greyer and more 70’s 80’s, even 90’s than others. All positioned for the view.  villa to letAnd why not?  Millendreath boxesMeanwhile another valley along from Looe, rural idyls and a well used muck spreader. muck spread valleyAnd the Monkey Sanctuary. MonkeyORD 49b.  Fish and chips fork. Piece of trigpoint broken off ORD 49b49 Strava

TPK Walk 48: Padderbury Top – Looe golf club

Padderbury Top was an iron age defended settlement. It looks like a grassy mound from the road but from the air…Padderbury top TPPadderbury top viewAs I get going I hopelessly try to catch the Lark ascending with my pen, its melodious drone cutting through the still morning mist.DCIM145GOPROA beetle is lost on the tarmac desert road.  DCIM145GOPRODCIM145GOPROOther rural creatures include the rare Yellowhammer, Emberiza citrinella, unphased by my awkward fumbling to capture him.  YellowhammerIn Menheniot after the sun has burnt the mist away Mrs Clue used to drive the children in her Coach to school and teach them. Mr Clue witnessed a WWII air battle over the village and American troop camps, stories and strong memories he captures in his naive upcycled art, their house filled with reconstructed memorabilia, which is both charming and rich in narrative.  DCIM145GOPROMemorialHMS Rawalpindicoming homeClue art2Clue artadult toy vehicleswakorskyRAF font of the weekSt Lalluwy in Menheniot village has a rare example of a Cornish church steeple and an elaborately sculptured cross near the entrance marks a Trelawney grave with the family motto ‘Sermoni consona facta’ carved into the base which means ‘Deeds agreeing with words’.MenheniotConsonaSundialBetween these old Cornish villages lie valleys, watermills and small farmsteads, fragments of an older way of life that existed long before the railway that twists slowly towards Plymouth.  Valley floorDCIM145GOPROThe friendly GWR worker likes keeping Menheniot and the other unmanned stations tidy and enjoys free train travel for his family.  DCIM145GOPRODCIM145GOPRODCIM145GOPROThe Granite hole that once built the bridges and buildings of the area now has been rebranded to provide adventure tourism opportunities. Being well connected to the A38, land use diversification morphs to satisfy the zeitgeist of modern pleasure seeking and car travel.  A38 WarburtonsAnd just the other side of the A38 off the beaten GPS track an abandoned Landy and strange woodland creatures swell in the sudden warm spring. LandySpring woodland creaturesI have to avoid whizzing golf balls but the view from Trigpoint 48 atop Looe golf course is worth it.  DCIM145GOPROTP 48 view48 StravaThe found objects of this walk all had transport connections (cats eye, spark plug, mud flap etc…). Apt then, that upon leaving this drawing/rubbing upon the roof of my car and driving off, the board was crushed and poetically crumpled under a truck wheel. Fortunately I found it 24 hours later just about intact.  ORD 48

Next week: Towards Looe and the coastal path